WALKERS –DO US A FLAVOUR TWEET CAMPAIGN. GENIUS!
This is fun. Walkers Crisps have put a virtual Gary Lineker inside a Twitter-activated vending machine. Watch to see how people react as he hands out free packs of newly flavored crisps, devised by the the 6 finalist of the Do Us A Flavour campaign. The winner gets 1million quid no less.
 See the video here.
"Walkers loves bringing fun to the nation and we are extremely excited to launch the first ever Twitter vending machine on the streets of London," said Walkers marketing manager Lee-Teng Chung.
Walkers are the latest brand to take social media to the streets as part of it’s ‘Do us a flavour’ campaign. The crisp-giant invites passers-by to ‘Tweet to Eat’ using the Twitter handle, @Walkers_busstop. The vending machines at the bus stops are programmed to dispense free packets of crisps every time someone tweets the account.
The campaign was created by created by OMD UK, AMV BBDO, Talon and Clear Channel. 

WALKERS –DO US A FLAVOUR TWEET CAMPAIGN. GENIUS!

This is fun. Walkers Crisps have put a virtual Gary Lineker inside a Twitter-activated vending machine. Watch to see how people react as he hands out free packs of newly flavored crisps, devised by the the 6 finalist of the Do Us A Flavour campaign. The winner gets 1million quid no less.

 See the video here.

"Walkers loves bringing fun to the nation and we are extremely excited to launch the first ever Twitter vending machine on the streets of London," said Walkers marketing manager Lee-Teng Chung.

Walkers are the latest brand to take social media to the streets as part of it’s ‘Do us a flavour’ campaign. The crisp-giant invites passers-by to ‘Tweet to Eat’ using the Twitter handle, @Walkers_busstop. The vending machines at the bus stops are programmed to dispense free packets of crisps every time someone tweets the account.

The campaign was created by created by OMD UK, AMV BBDO, Talon and Clear Channel. 

APPLE COMES UNDER FIRE OVER ITS PHILOSOPHY VIDEO ‘PERSPECTIVE’, DEEMED A RIP-OFF

In addition to the presentation of its new products and services, Apple has unveiled a video called “Perspective,” which it framed as a tribute to people “who have always seen things differently.”

However, when you are Apple, you are scrutinized at every turn. What a nightmare for those who are tasked with their branding. OK Go, a popular band known for their videos, have accused Apple of copying one of their videos, according to a Bloomberg BusinessWeek report.

Apple’s ways of seeing things isn’t different enough”, says Andy Gershon, manager of the band OK Go. He claims that Apple hasn’t been so ‘different’ with this video and has just copied their video for the song The Writing on the Wall.

I have to admit, I got a wee bit sucked in with the media frenzy over this, but fundamentally I am a fan of a differentiating philosophy that has stood the test of time, decades in fact.

This is familiar territory for Apple, both in its technology and advertising. Taking someone’s idea and adapting it for your own purposes in this manner is generally not a violation of copyright law. It is also how creativity evolves, as long as you are seeing things differently at the same time.

The messages in the video: see things differently, follow vision not a path etc. are nice thoughts to underpin their philosophy. This video tells a compelling story and Apple have the balls to carry it off 

Tuesday’s launch has split opinions: is Apple Watch really all that: are they now copying Samsung: is an awkward finger tap on stage with an ageing rocker cool or just downright embarrasin? This is the world of the pioneer.

And this pioneer has the last word: “Different is the one thing about us that will always be the same”.

IKEA HOTEL COMING TO DUBLIN, COURTESY OF AIRBNB, WITH PUPPIES AND A STRING QUARTET FOR BREAKFAST!

"Airbnb gives people access to the most unique listings around the world from treehouses to yurts to villas, and now we’re adding Ikea to the list," Eva Ross, Local Operations Lead at Airbnb Australia, said in a statement. "The experience is sure to thrill any guest."

There’s one proviso in the fine print: “By entering, you agree to be part of an event that will be covered by the media,” it says. “Oh, and that you will be woken in the morning in a remarkable way. Nothing frightening — we promise!”

For anyone who has ever dreamed of sleeping in the giant blue box store without assembling the bed first, your moment has arrived — so long as you’re O.K. with surprises.

In what may well be the partnership of the century, Airbnb coupled with everyone’s favourite Scandinavian flat-packing store for one night only — August 31, at one store in Sydney. The cost, a mere 11 bucks.

Next stop Dublin. Apparently.

This isn’t IKEA’s first sleepover however. In 2012, the company invited 100 IKEA fans to crash for a night at its Essex store in the UK. And some locations in China encourage shoppers to field test the mattresses and couches.

Whatever next?

I rarely reblog, in fact possibly never. But there is nothing I can, or want to, add to this piece from Chris. Really thought provoking.

Click the link below for the full article.

wolffolinsblog:

imageBy Chris Moody

I believe Tesco’s problem is in its purest sense a ‘brand’ problem.

They have too much ‘brand’…

They have believed their own hype (or advisors). They are now drowning in a sea of pointless ‘branded properties’ with confusing ‘price drops’ and ‘click&collects’ and ‘club cards’…

CAN GAP REGAIN RELEVANCE BY REDEFINING ‘NORMAL’?

At the heart of GAP’s brand is the belief that ‘individualism and liberation comes from confidently being your most authentic self’.

This belief has been expressed in their new campaign “Dress Normal”.

According to Seth Farbman, Gap’s global chief marketing officer “Finding your own version of ‘Dress normal’ is an art. Dress Normal is about dressing for yourself. It’s about celebrating the confidence that comes by dressing how you’re most comfortable”.

So, here we have Angelica Houston, looking normal? That’s not normal. Is it? Alongside Angelica, other ‘normal’ looking people such as Elisabeth MossMichael K. WilliamsZosia MametJena Malone, Luke Grimes, Olivia Thirlby and Bobby Canavale are all clad in black denim in a series of print and online ads currently rolling out as part of Gap’s new advertising campaign by Wieden + Kennedy New York. All looking normal. Apparently.

You know, I am just not convinced. I really do not get it. At the surface level the concept is appealing (and very much on trend if you believe K-Hole the New York trend forecasting firm, who coined the term ‘Normcore’), but then the execution is so staged and soooo dated. This all looks like catalogue images from the 90’s. And more importantly, where does this fit with the belief of individualism and liberation?

"Normcore" is based on the idea of opting into sameness and looking for opportunities to create connections, rather than focusing on self-differentiation, according to K-Hole (love that name!).

Sorry Gap, but I am just not feeling it. You might just think about doing something new rather than post rationalising the blandness that defines you and your declining market share.

HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION TEAMS UP WITH MONOTYPE TO CREATE A NEW SLAB SERIF FONT, TO PUNCH OUT ILLITERACY.
With fists dripping with paint, Wladimir Klitschko punched out 26 letters of a new typeface, to create awareness that over 250 million children worldwide have no access to education.
The 26 prints created by Klitschko were then digitally scanned and used by Monotype to generate the font. Both the prints and the font were sold on eBay over the next 10 days. All money raised was donated to BILD’s "A Heart For Children" charity, which aims to combat illiteracy internationally.

Although donations are welcome, a digital version of Klitschko’s font is available for free download at Monotype’s official site.

HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION TEAMS UP WITH MONOTYPE TO CREATE A NEW SLAB SERIF FONT, TO PUNCH OUT ILLITERACY.

With fists dripping with paint, Wladimir Klitschko punched out 26 letters of a new typeface, to create awareness that over 250 million children worldwide have no access to education.

The 26 prints created by Klitschko were then digitally scanned and used by Monotype to generate the font. Both the prints and the font were sold on eBay over the next 10 days. All money raised was donated to BILD’s "A Heart For Children" charity, which aims to combat illiteracy internationally.

Although donations are welcome, a digital version of Klitschko’s font is available for free download at Monotype’s official site.

ART FOR ART’S SAKE, MONEY FOR GOD’S SAKE.  ISN’T THAT HOW THE LYRICS GO? 
The concept that art exists for it’s own sake with no ideological or purposeful ends is strange to me. The denial that art can be therapeutic also. Have you ever been to a gallery, museum or exhibit and exited with a deep sense of calm or elation? It gets me every time and my mind is not my own for some time after.

The present ‘guardians of culture’ – art and literary critics employed by media organisations, professors in the humanities and museum curators – are deeply devoted to the idea that art should exist ‘for art’s sake.’ Here The Philosophers Mail argues for the enormous task that lies before art and culture, if only it can become conscious of its true purpose.

ART FOR ART’S SAKE, MONEY FOR GOD’S SAKE.
ISN’T THAT HOW THE LYRICS GO?

The concept that art exists for it’s own sake with no ideological or purposeful ends is strange to me. The denial that art can be therapeutic also. Have you ever been to a gallery, museum or exhibit and exited with a deep sense of calm or elation? It gets me every time and my mind is not my own for some time after.

The present ‘guardians of culture’ – art and literary critics employed by media organisations, professors in the humanities and museum curators – are deeply devoted to the idea that art should exist ‘for art’s sake.’ Here The Philosophers Mail argues for the enormous task that lies before art and culture, if only it can become conscious of its true purpose.

DIRTY BIRD HAS LOCALS IN A FLAP

So, you logo is not a penis then?
The owner of Cardiff based chicken outlet, Dirty Bird, has insisted that people are seeing what they want to see, and not what was intended. He claims that the logo is simply the lower case initials of the company placed back to back in order to form the neck and wings of a cockerel. Really.

Ok. So it is just co-incidental that your marketing is loaded with sexual innuendo? Um.

Dirty Bird scored top in the top “10 epic business logo fails” (Solopress blog). I am not sure it is a fail though, and neither is the owner who when he heard the news exclaimed on facebook;

We got Number 1 in the epic business logo fails chart!

DIRTY!!!

In my (humble and rather shocked) opinion, the Arlington Paediatric Centre should have been awarded the no 1 slot.

The power of controversy. The logo was designed by Something creatives.

PACKAGING THAT MADE ME SMILE

Trident Xtra Care, designed by Hani Douaji. A range of six variations, which represents three flavors. Each packet has an illustration : a mouth or a mustache, sometimes smiling or surprised. 

I am still smiling.

DOES YOUR BRAND INFLUENCE YOUR MARKETING?OR, DOES YOUR MARKETING INFLUENCE YOUR BRAND?THINK ABOUT IT.
How you market yourself determines, to a large extent, how you are perceived. How you are perceived determines your positioning, your relevance and ultimately your survival. Yet many companies do not connect their higher-level strategic objectives to everyday marketing activity.
You may argue that experience determines how you are perceived and I would not argue with that. Experience is the ultimate test as it combines the proposition with reality. If the customer experience is not aligned to the marketing proposition, then ultimately perceptions will be affected.
You see: it all has to be connected. The business strategic vision needs to be connected to the organisation: in turn it needs to be connected to the marketing proposition, which in turn needs to be connected to the customer experience. Put into a sentence, it seems simple, but in reality it is extremely difficult.
This is why many organisations outsource the problem, to their advertising agencies: for a creative solution. Sometimes this works. Sometimes the agency looks into the soul of the organisation and connects that meaningfully to the consumer: thus creating a compelling proposition for the consumer and a powerful and emotive proposition for the organisation to row in behind. Sometimes. I have seen it happen. But most times, the agency will not have the luxury of such noble thinking. They will be on a purely tactical trajectory. The creative may win awards from industry peers, but the net result may well be a slow march to commoditisation and price fighting.
Lets take a step back. What if. Instead of outsourcing the problem, the organisation looked to determine it’s positioning strategy first? 
Asking itself: What place in the market can we credibly and relevantly occupy, how will that differentiate us, how do we need to be perceived to occupy that space and (looking into our own soul) how aligned are we culturally and operationally?
These are fundamental questions, that, when asked, provide a solid brand foundation and a compass with which to influence not just marketing but every facet of the organisation. This extends the role of brand beyond marketing, to that of a business strategic tool.    
     
 

DOES YOUR BRAND INFLUENCE YOUR MARKETING?
OR, DOES YOUR MARKETING INFLUENCE YOUR BRAND?
THINK ABOUT IT.

How you market yourself determines, to a large extent, how you are perceived. How you are perceived determines your positioning, your relevance and ultimately your survival. Yet many companies do not connect their higher-level strategic objectives to everyday marketing activity.

You may argue that experience determines how you are perceived and I would not argue with that. Experience is the ultimate test as it combines the proposition with reality. If the customer experience is not aligned to the marketing proposition, then ultimately perceptions will be affected.

You see: it all has to be connected. The business strategic vision needs to be connected to the organisation: in turn it needs to be connected to the marketing proposition, which in turn needs to be connected to the customer experience. Put into a sentence, it seems simple, but in reality it is extremely difficult.

This is why many organisations outsource the problem, to their advertising agencies: for a creative solution. Sometimes this works. Sometimes the agency looks into the soul of the organisation and connects that meaningfully to the consumer: thus creating a compelling proposition for the consumer and a powerful and emotive proposition for the organisation to row in behind. Sometimes. I have seen it happen. But most times, the agency will not have the luxury of such noble thinking. They will be on a purely tactical trajectory. The creative may win awards from industry peers, but the net result may well be a slow march to commoditisation and price fighting.

Lets take a step back. What if. Instead of outsourcing the problem, the organisation looked to determine it’s positioning strategy first?

Asking itself: What place in the market can we credibly and relevantly occupy, how will that differentiate us, how do we need to be perceived to occupy that space and (looking into our own soul) how aligned are we culturally and operationally?

These are fundamental questions, that, when asked, provide a solid brand foundation and a compass with which to influence not just marketing but every facet of the organisation. This extends the role of brand beyond marketing, to that of a business strategic tool.